2020 AGM Update

The AGM was due to be held on 9th July at Benington Lordship.  At their recent virtual meeting, the Executive Committee took the decision that, although the economy is opening up, it was just too early to be gathering, even though we could all be at a safe distance outside.  We have therefore postponed this event to Thursday 3rdSeptember 2020 at a slightly earlier time.

By kind invitation of Richard and Susannah Bott, the AGM will be held on the 3rd September at Benington Lordship, Nr Stevenage, SG2 7BS.  The garden will be open at 5pm for a wander and the meeting will be at the earlier time of 6pm.  The Accounts for the year to March 2020 will be posted on the website in advance of the meeting and copies will be available on the night.  Do stay on after the meeting for a picnic in the garden.  Please bring your own drinks this time as we do not know what the restrictions will be by then and we would rather you were completely safe.

We are still looking for nominations for the HGT Chair and HGT Membership Secretary.  The details were in the last newsletter but please consider a role.  If you have any questions, please contact chair@hertsgardenstrust.org.uk.  The nominations should be submitted no later than 23rd July.

Other news is that the website now has a page for photographs of members’ gardens or special views encountered when walking.  It is accessed from the home page of the website at www.hertsgardenstrust.org.uk.  Please send digital images to membership@hertsgardenstrust.org.uk as we would love to see more hidden gems in Hertfordshire.

The Gedye Fund now stands at £1,750.  Very many thanks to everyone who has contributed.  Let’s hope we will be able to plan a very special inaugural event next year.

Enjoy the rest of the summer and we look forward to seeing you all in person on Thursday 3rd September.

With best wishes,

The Executive Committee

Our Garden Galleries

Our Garden Galleries

We do hope you have stayed well, enjoyed the weather and your gardens and managed to remain positive in these strange times.

HGT would by now have visited our first garden in Essex and been on the first walk to Forty Hall. If you are missing these and a fix of other gardens, we have organised something slightly different and new for our members.

We now have some pages here on the website for photographs of members’ gardens or a favourite Hertfordshire view that you have encountered on a walk. To view our gardens, click on the Parks and Gardens link above. You will then see in the drop-down menu, a link to Members’ Gardens.

If you would like to offer photographs of your garden which you would be happy to share with other members, please send digital images to membership@hertsgardenstrust.org.uk. Please send a maximum of six in the first instance.

Here is a link to the National Gardens Scheme website www.ngs.org.uk where some members have done a virtual tour of their garden in place of opening to the public. 

With best wishes,
The Executive Committee

Village 7 Gilston Garden Village

Village 7 Gilston Garden Village

Here is the text of a letter The Gardens Trust and the Hertfordshire Gardens Trust have sent to East Herts Council Planners.

Context:

Recently HGT, following research by Anne Rowe and Tom Williamson were successful in having henry VIII’s great pond chain along the Hunsdon Brook recognised as a national Scheduled Monument. This should give it, and its setting, the greatest protection. We are therefor very concerned about the plans for this development which totally ignore the wealth of heritage assets in the area. Hunsdon Park, in particular merits much further detailed examination, lying as it does, between the Ponds and Hunsdon House (formerly the great Tudor Palace where Henry VII’s children were brought up in part)

Plan Details: 3/19/2124/OUT on https://publicaccess.eastherts.gov.uk/online-applications/

Text of Letter: 

We have grave concerns that the many key heritage assets in this area will be harmed by this development. The documents in this application do not give sufficient information on specific measures to address light, noise, and traffic pollution on the heritage assets and indicate that the key parkland setting rising eastwards from Lords Wood will be destroyed.

The parkland lying between Lords Wood and Hunsdon House was part of the great Tudor parkland, further details of which can be found in Rowe, A Tudor and Early Stuart Parks of Hertfordshire. The ponds in Lords Wood, now a Scheduled Monument, are closely stylistically related to European Renaissance water features of the time, such as at Pratolino, at a time when Henry VIII was introducing renaissance culture into England. The parkland, formerly Pond Park, provides the setting for Hunsdon church, visible from the ponds area and is depicted in an 1546/47 portrait of the future Edward VI by William Scots, and is also the setting for the ponds which are now the SM.

To the south of the site lies the important 18th  century park and house of Briggens, and the park of Stanstead Bury, all nationally designated by Historic England. To the west of the site lies Olive’s Farm, purchased by Henry VIII as part of his Hunsdon estate, whose land overlooks the Pond Park. To the North of the site lies Hunsdon Park and House.

The setting of all these heritage assets will be affected by the layout of Village 7 on the rising ground north of the A414. The setting of heritage assets is a key part of their significance as detailed in both the NPPF and in the Historic England the Setting of Heritage Assets (GPA3.2). Heritage assets are an irreplaceable resource and should be conserved in a manner appropriate to their significance (para 184), and when considering the impact of a proposed development on the significance of a designated heritage asset, great weight should be given to that asset’s conservation (para 193).

HGT, on our behalf, commented on the heritage significance of the Gilston Area including Village 7, during the Local Plan process and we also commented (2nd July 2019 – see attached) on the wider Gilston application 3/19/1045/OUT.

We consider that further consideration must be given to ways of mitigating the detrimental effect of the proposed development upon the various heritage assets. We would like to see the development removed entirely from the Pond Park section.

Stop Harlow Northhttps://www.facebook.com/STOP-Harlow-North-Campaign-151589618240500/

New book: Structure and Landscape

New book: Structure and Landscape

William Wilkins and Humphry Repton at Haileybury 1806‐1810 edited by Toby Parker and Kate Harwood

The Study Day organised by HGT at Haileybury in 2015 presented new information about the construction of the East India College and its Landscape.

These Proceedings of that Study Day, with some additional papers, provide new insights to both the buildings and Repton’s landscape and his considerable involvement in the site as well as the importance of the College as innovative in concept, design and execution.

To order a copy of this book please send your name, address and a cheque for £14.00 (to include p&p) made payable to
Hertfordshire Gardens Trust to:

HGT, 78 Broadstone Road, Harpenden, Herts AL5 1RE

Please send queries to : conservation@hertsgardentrust.org.uk

Gobions Wood

Gobions Wood

The Research Group has undertaken surveys of Gobions Wood at Brookmans Park. Within this lovely wood lie the earthwork remains of a famous eighteenth-century garden designed by Charles Bridgeman for Jeremy Sambrooke and laid out in the 1720s. Visited by many notable people, including Queen Caroline, the garden was one of Bridgeman’s most significant designs, and was considered by Horace Walpole to represent an important stage in the development of the ‘landscape’ style.

Exciting new evidence about the layout of the garden came to light with the discovery of a plan in the Bodleian Library at Oxford. An article assessing the significance of the plan, written by Tom Williamson and Anne Rowe, was published in the journal Garden History in 2012. Here are some photographs of the Research Group hard at work in Gobions Wood on two gloriously sunny spring days in March 2012.